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JOHN BEASLEY’s MONK’estra

USF’s Monday Night Jazz:
Celebrating the Thelonious
Monk Centennial
Monday, February 26, 7:30 PM


John Beasley, the pianist/composer/arranger
whose MONK’estra project has received four
Grammy nominations, will bring his dazzling new
interpretations of Thelonious Monk’s music to
USF’s Monday Night Jazz on February 26. To
honor the Monk Centennial Year, Beasley will
conduct the USF JAZZ ENSEMBLE in the USF
Concert Hall, beginning at 7:30. Monday Night
Jazz, a monthly concert series for more than 20
years, is presented by the USF School of Music,
WUSF's All Night Jazz and the Tampa Jazz Club.

A jazz veteran who was the pianist for both Miles
Davis and Freddie Hubbard in his early years,
John Beasley has been Music Director for world
tours by Steely Dan, Queen Latifah, and others.
Based in Hollywood, he has extensive
experience working on major film soundtracks,
and as arranger for television, from ‘American
Idol’ to ‘The Kennedy Center Honors.’  Beasley
has also directed the International Jazz Day global
concerts presented by UNESCO since their
inception, from venues in Paris, Istanbul, Osaka,
Havana, and The White House.

As the world paid tribute in the past year to the
centennial of the birth of Thelonious Monk,
Beasley’s visionary arrangements of Monk’s
music became a sensation in the jazz world. The
two MONK’estra albums shine a new light on
Monk’s singular sound, with contemporary
harmonies, unstoppable grooves, and a real
sense of fun.

The 18-piece USF JAZZ ENSEMBLE gave listeners
an unforgettable treat at November’s Monday
Night Jazz, playing under the direction of
composer John Clayton. Don’t miss their
collaboration with JOHN BEASLEY and his bold
explorations of Monk – described by the
International Review of Music as ‘some of the
most mesmerizing big band music of recent
memory.’